Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Summer Is Coming -- Here Are Some Tips On How To Handle Heat Stroke


With the hot summer months approaching we thought this article about heat stroke might come in handy.


Heat Stroke: Symptoms and Treatment

Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat injury and is a medical emergency. If you suspect that someone has heat stroke — also known as sunstroke — you should call 911 immediately and render first aid until paramedics arrive.

Heat stroke can kill or cause damage to the brain and other internal organs. Although heat stroke mainly affects people over age 50, it also takes a toll on healthy young athletes.

Heat stroke often occurs as a progression from milder heat-related illnesses such as heat cramps, heat syncope (fainting), and heat exhaustion. But it can strike even if you have no previous signs of heat injury.

Heat stroke results from prolonged exposure to high temperatures — usually in combination with dehydration — which leads to failure of the body’s temperature control system. The medical definition of heat stroke is a core body temperature greater than 105 degrees Fahrenheit, with complications involving the central nervous system that occur after exposure to high temperatures. Other common symptoms include nausea, seizures, confusion, disorientation, and sometimes loss of consciousness or coma.

Symptoms of Heat Stroke

The hallmark symptom of heat stroke is a core body temperature above 105 degrees Fahrenheit. But fainting may be the first sign.

Other symptoms may include:

Throbbing headache
Dizziness and light-headedness
Lack of sweating despite the heat
Red, hot, and dry skin
Muscle weakness or cramps
Nausea and vomiting
Rapid heartbeat, which may be either strong or weak
Rapid, shallow breathing
Behavioral changes such as confusion, disorientation, or staggering
Seizures
Unconsciousness

First Aid for Heat Stroke

If you suspect that someone has a heat stroke, immediately call 911 or transport the person to a hospital. Any delay seeking medical help can be fatal.

While waiting for the paramedics to arrive, initiate first aid. Move the person to an air-conditioned environment — or at least a cool, shady area — and remove any unnecessary clothing.

If possible, take the person’s core body temperature and initiate first aid to cool it to 101 to 102 degrees Fahrenheit. If no thermometers are available, don’t hesitate to initiate first aid.

You may also try these cooling strategies:

Fan air over the patient while wetting his or her skin with water from a sponge or garden hose.
Apply ice packs to the patient’s armpits, groin, neck, and back. Because these areas are rich with blood     vessels close to the skin, cooling them may reduce body temperature.
Immerse the patient in a shower or tub of cool water, or an ice bath.

If emergency response is delayed, call the hospital emergency room for additional instructions.

After you’ve recovered from heat stroke, you’ll probably be more sensitive to high temperatures during the following week. So it’s best to avoid hot weather and heavy exercise until your doctor tells you that it’s safe to resume your normal activities.

Article source:  http://www.WebMD.com
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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

The Selfie



Did you know the first photographic self-portrait was taken by Robert Cornelius in 1839? 
Today the Oxford Dictionaries announced their word of the year for 2013 to be “selfie”, which they define as “a photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically one taken with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website.” Although the rampant proliferation of the technique is quite recent, the “selfie” itself is far from being a strictly modern phenomenon. Indeed, the photographic self-portrait is surprisingly common in the very early days of photography exploration and invention, when it was often more convenient for the experimenting photographer to act as model as well. In fact, the picture considered by many to be the first photographic portrait ever taken was a “selfie”. The image in question was taken in 1839 by an amateur chemist and photography enthusiast from Philadelphia named Robert Cornelius. Cornelius had set his camera up at the back of the family store in Philadelphia. He took the image by removing the lens cap and then running into frame where he sat for a minute before covering up the lens again. On the back he wrote “The first light Picture ever taken. 1839.”
I don't often see people in their 60's taking selfie's and wonder if I would take one if my kids or grandkids would be embarrassed if I took a selfie or two.  They don't seem to be embarrassed when I take a picture of myself and a friend.  So what might the real difference be between a selfie and a twosie?



Monday, April 14, 2014

Coffee Break





Sure, coffee and tea help us stay awake, but they may also help us stay alive.  Among nearly 2,500 people over age 40, coffee and tea drinkers died at lower rates over 10 years than those who abstained, a study shows.  Each daily cup of joe -- regular or decaf -- cut coffee lovers' risk of death by 7%.  Each cup of tea slashed the risk by 9%.
Source:  Nutrition